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Easy Chords

John Meranda has transcribed a large number of Kirstysongs for your pleasure. He also offers this ‘easy’ technique to help you along.

Here, you will find a simple way of playing barchords in order to make it easier for you play just about any Kirsty song!

How It Works

Rarely have I seen a person fail who has thoroughly followed the ‘Easy Chord’ method. 😉 In my ‘Easy Chord’ system, you will see a number, followed by either an E, Em, A or Amin chord.

The number represents the fret you cover (using your index finger), followed by an E, Em, A or Amin chord. It’s that simple!

Examples

A ‘B’ chord is played as an ‘A’ chord, with the index fingers covering the strings on the 2nd fret, right?

My ‘Easy Chord’ would be ‘2A’

Played as a barchord, an ‘F’ chord, would be played as an ‘E’ chord with the index finger covering the strings on the 1st fret. My ‘Easy Chord’ would be ‘1E’.

Here you will find a full listing of my ‘Easy Chords’, their technical name, and a column for specific fingering, as used by akoustic and www.chordfind.com.

Side note: Some basic chords (G, F, Dm, B) are often times best being played as barchords. (3E, 1A, 5Am, and 2A respectively) when playing some of these Kirsty songs, but you can probably better determine when it’s best to do that.

I hope these ‘Easy Chords’ will enable you to make some of the more complicated-ooking chords easier to play. It’s not a perfect system, but it might be perfect for you!

Have fun, Kirsty fans!

John Meranda
john.meranda@oracle.com